Mapping Nucleosome Resolution Chromosome Folding in Yeast by Micro-C

micro-C

We describe a Hi-C-based method, Micro-C, in which micrococcal nuclease is used instead of restriction enzymes to fragment chromatin, enabling nucleosome resolution chromosome folding maps. Analysis of Micro-C maps for budding yeast reveals abundant self-associating domains similar to those reported in other species, but not previously observed in yeast. These structures, far shorter than topologically associating domains in mammals, typically encompass one to five genes in yeast. Strong boundaries between self-associating domains occur at promoters of highly transcribed genes and regions of rapid histone turnover that are typically bound by the RSC chromatin-remodeling complex. Investigation of chromosome folding in mutants … Read more!…

Measuring Chromatin Structure in Budding Yeast

Budding yeast

Chromosome conformation capture (3C) has revolutionized the ways in which the conformation of chromatin and its relationship to other molecular functions can be studied. 3C-based techniques areĀ used to determine the spatial arrangement of chromosomes in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. In particular, they can be applied to the study of chromosome folding and organization in model organisms with small genomes and for which powerful genetic tools exist, such as budding yeast. Studies in yeast allow the mechanisms that establish or maintain chromatin structure to be analyzed at very high resolution with relatively low cost, and further our understanding of … Read more!…

Job Dekker nominated Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator

Job Dekker, HHMI

A pioneer in the study of the three-dimensional structure of the genome, Job Dekker, PhD, professor of biochemistry & molecular pharmacology and co-director of the Program in Systems Biology, was named a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigator. Dr. Dekker, developer of the chromosome conformation technologies used to map the topography of the genome, was one of 26 scientists chosen for his scientific excellence from a pool of 894 applicants. Over the next five years, HHMI has committed $153 million to support these innovative scientists. Link to: Complete article, HHMI … Read more!…